Tag: business women

Birmingham Business Journal Spotlights Momentum Executive Class Alumnae

On February 22nd, 2021, the Birmingham Business Journal hosted a free Webinar themed “BizWomen Mentoring Monday.” The 90-minute round-table coaching session presented the opportunity for women to engage with and learn from 44 pioneering Birmingham businesswomen (featuring our own: Barbara Burton, Joy Carter, and Teresa Shufflebarger). The general leadership  development session was followed by breakout sessions and a Q&A. This event is one of 40 ones across the country overseen by the national news publisher, American City Business Journals. The events are swelling support for women to meaningfully network with incredible numbers: 1,700 mentors and 8,600 mentees.

 

Our Alumnae:

Barbara Burton is the President and Founder of the Chalker Group, a women-run firm that aids with the recruitment of bright talent for local businesses and organizations. By facilitating resources and ways to connect with our lovely city, Barbara has successfully curated meaningful experiences for candidates and their families.

We are lucky to know Barbara as a graduate of our Executive Class 17 (spanning 2019-2020) – their group were the pioneers of our online classes due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Barbara’s community-orientation carries beyond her work. In addition to being recognized by Leadership Birmingham (2015) and Leadership Alabama (2016), she has been a board member for the Birmingham Botanical Gardens, the Rotary Club of Birmingham, and the UAB O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Teresa Shufflebarger was recently appointed to be the VP and Chief Administrative Officer of Live HealthSmart at UAB. The platform aims to create statewide partnerships and initiatives with a mission of elevating Alabama out of the bottom ten for national health rankings. Teresa previously served as the System Vice President for Baptist Health System (between 2004 and 2015), and became the Chief Strategy Officer for Brookwood Baptist Health before embarking as Founder and CEO of Allegro Partners.


We are lucky to know Teresa as a member of our Executive Class 11 (spanning 2014-2015). She carries a wealth of passion and knowledge for improving health access, and we are excited to see the ways she continues to flour side as a healthcare leader in the Birmingham community.

 

Please join us in congratulating these women and their fellow mentors. To learn more about the event or see a catalog and bio about each mentor in the cohort please click here.

Birmingham’s Moving Upward

It can be difficult to stay motivated as we push on toward a world without COVID. We may be biased, but we’re pretty proud of how our leaders are making a difference in our city. Our Upward program was created specifically for women in the beginning of their career to develop the next generation of talented leadership. Here’s just a few of our Upward alumnae who work diligently to create dynamic change.

  • Lauren Leach, Associate Vice President of Planning & Population Health, UAB Medicine
    • Leach has been working to coordinate unique solutions for working parents during the pandemic. After recognizing the need for childcare assistance for over 1,000 UAB employees, she helped strategize short-term relief.
  • Lee Thrash, Donor Relations Manager, United Ability
    • When United Ability closed due to COVID, she had to adapt quickly to continue promoting their cause. “…everyone had to change the way they operated. It really showed us all how amazing the participants in United Ability’s programs, the staff, and families really are – how much we all care for each other.”
  • Monica Aswani, Assistant Professor, School of Heath Professions, UAB
    • Dr. Aswani joined COVID taskforce UAB United on the Incident Command Committee to help flatten the curve of COVID cases.
  • Brenessa Lindeman, Associate Designated Institutional Official for the Clinical Learning Environment, UAB
    • Medical care is a valuable resource during the pandemic, and efficiency is of the utmost importance. Lindeman worked to introduce new technology at UAB that adds apps to patients’ electronic records so clinicians can provide improved patient care.
  • Britney Summerville, Vice President of Community Engagement, Shipt
    • Summerville founded Birmingham Bound, a program aimed at growing Birmingham’s tech community. “The organization is also ‘spreading the word across the nation that Birmingham is a tech ecosystem that should be on their radar,'” according to Summerville.

Get Woke with Your Vote

As the election nears, social media platforms have become inundated with voting content. Although advancements in technology have made voting information more accessible than ever before, it can still be confusing to find the deadlines and addresses you need in the sea of posts. Whichever side of politics you’re on, one thing is clear: this election is incredibly important. It’s been over 100 hundred years since the last pandemic struck the US, and the elected president will influence the outcome of the current pandemic in our country.

Only half of all eligible voters in the US exercise their right to vote. Convincing these voters to participate in the upcoming election is daunting, but powerhouse Birminghamian Dejuana Thompson is determined to make a difference. After a stint as Senior Advisor for the Small Business Administration, Thompson founded Think Rubix, LLC, which works alongside nonprofits, businesses, and governments to enact social change.

One of their projects is Woke Vote, works to, “invest in the activation, long-term engagement, training and development of new organizers, and mobilization of historically disengaged voters of color.” Data-driven research has proven their tactics have resulted in unprecedented increases in voter turnout.

Their program has gained national acclaim as a proven catalyst for voting, and their focus on community engagement couldn’t come at a better time. Recent racial unrest both locally and nationally is discouraging and overwhelming, but people now have the opportunity to elect politicians who reflect their values and opinions.

Still unsure of your voting status? We’ve gathered some resources to ensure you have the information you need!

  • Confirm your registration status and/or find your polling location here
  • Find your elected officials here
  • Here are the official amendments included in the Alabama ballot. Want an easier to read version? WBHM explains them here
  • Any additional questions? Rock the Vote has all the answers

Until There Are Nine

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was notorious for her persistent fight to advocate for women, but her legacy goes beyond the work she accomplished as a Supreme Court justice, and she was not always esteemed for her fierce determination. As a student at Harvard Law School, she was criticized for “taking a man’s place,” even though she ended up tying for first in her class. Many women in the US are currently struggling to work from home while managing their children’s schoolwork. The Notorious RBG was no stranger to this dilemma. When her husband was diagnosed with cancer while they were both in law school, she took all of his notes and typed all of his papers in addition to her own, all while taking care of her newborn daughter. She faced discrimination in the workplace and had a hard time finding a job, but once she got started, she was on a roll.

Ginsburg, like most women, was also scrutinized for her personality. She was too serious, too forgiving. Too progressive, not progressive enough. Her appointment was eventually supported by feminists, but some gawked at her close friendship with the late conservative justice Antonin Scalia. Their relationship served as a reminder to the country that relationships can transcend political boundaries. They frequently traveled together, attending operas and riding elephants. However, his views did not bleed into hers, and she went on to become the leading liberal justice on the Supreme Court.

She was an expert of making the most of what she had. As a frequent member of the minority vote in the Supreme Court, she made history for her eloquent dissents, some of which eventually inspired new laws. Some of the highlights of her legacy precede her time in the Supreme Court. She co-founded the Women’s Rights wing of the American Civil Liberties Union, became the first tenured female law professor at Columbia, and co-founded the first women’s rights law journal, all during the 1970s, when most boardrooms had no room for women. In her later years, she became a pop icon, inspiring teens to become politically involved as she demonstrated her workout routine on late night television.

Ginsburg inspired men and women both through her actions and her words. As the second woman to ever be nominated to the US Supreme Court, she knew that it would take serious work for women to be effectively represented.

“When I’m sometimes asked ‘When will there be enough [women on the Supreme Court]?’ and I say ‘When there are nine,’ people are shocked. But there’d been nine men, and nobody’s ever raised a question about that.” -Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Although she is no longer with us, her story is not over. Her work continues to inspire efforts toward representation and equal pay. She persisted, and we must continue to persist.