Category: FaceTime

Facetime interviews with Momentum Alumnae.

MEET ALUMNA CHERI CANON

One of the greatest things about Momentum is the powerful alumnae network. Periodically we interview these amazing women about their experience in our program.

Cheri L. Canon, M.D., F.A.C.R., F.A.A.W.R. is a Professor and Witten-Stanley Endowed Chair of Radiology at the UAB School of Medicine and sits on UAB Medicine Joint Operating Leadership Council. She served as an oral examiner for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) for eleven years, a member of the Board of Trustees, and now sits on its Board of Governors. She was the vice chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR), chancellor on the board, and previously served as the chair of the ACR Commission on Education. She is the President-elect of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments (SCARD) and the co-creator of LEAD, a new women’s leadership development program jointly developed by SCARD and GE Healthcare. She is active in the Birmingham community and is a member of the Birmingham Rotary Club and is the current president for Momentum, a Birmingham women’s leadership organization.

What did you gain from your Momentum experience?

I gained a remarkable network of brilliant and supportive women, a foundational skill set for business and leadership, and the confidence to move forward.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

Do the pre-meeting work. Reach out to others and understand their positions on topics in advance of the discussion, because by the time the meeting is called to order, decisions are already cemented.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18-year-old self?

I would tell her, but I know she won’t believe me: Be confident. You are capable of this, and there will be a point in your life when you do feel comfortable in your skin and you will feel empowered. At that point, own it, then give back.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

I don’t think the challenges will change. Those women will suffer the same implicit and overt biases that will make them question their worth. They will be challenged with an overwhelming list of things they want to (must) accomplish and must learn to manage through it.

What do you think organizations need to do differently for more women to rise into executive roles?

Sponsor their women! Skill building, mentoring, and networking are important, but executive sponsorship is the missing piece.

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?

Empathetic, optimistic, visionary.

How do you manage your career, home, and community life?

I have no idea. It’s a constant juggle of shifting priorities and an attempt to integrate (not balance) across all three.

What advice do you have for aspiring leaders?

Step-up and lead. Be fearless. Give back.

Dr. Canon was interviewed by Bella Tylicki, senior PR student at UAB. 

Meet Alumna Jennifer Buettner

One of the greatest things about Momentum is the powerful alumnae network. Periodically we interview these amazing women about their experience in our program.

Jennifer Buettner is the Executive Director of the Birmingham Bar Association, an association of approximately 3,500 attorneys in the greater Birmingham area. She is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the BBA, which provides a range of services to members in their practices. In her role, Jennifer ensures that the BBA offers meaningful educational and professional programs for attorneys, hosts events where members can network and get to know each other, provides opportunities for attorneys to develop leadership competencies, and encourages attorneys to engage in public service.

Jennifer also serves as the Executive Director of the Birmingham Bar Foundation, which is the 501(c)(3) charitable arm of the BBA whose mission is to unify the philanthropic and educational efforts of the BBA.

Before becoming Executive Director of the BBA and the BBF, Jennifer was a practicing attorney for 18 years. She began her legal career with Balch & Bingham and, after becoming a partner, moved to an in-house position with Southern Company. Throughout her career at Southern Company, she took on roles of increasing responsibility, first focusing on transactional matters and then moving into an executive level position at the nuclear power division of the company.

In addition to being a Momentum alumna, Jennifer serves on the Board of Directors for Oasis and Hand in Paw and is a past President of The Literacy Council Board of Directors. She is married to Ernest Bates and they are the parents of Claire, a 5-pound bobtailed cat who thinks she is a dog. Both Jennifer and Ernest are Birmingham natives and enjoy all of the exciting restaurants, bars, events and opportunities that Birmingham has to offer our community.

What did you gain from your Momentum experience? 

Momentum allowed me to see that it is not only okay, but also necessary, to focus on myself, improve myself and care for myself. Men are terrific at focusing on themselves, but women need to be better at it. We need to realize that to be good leaders we must be self-aware and continually on a path of improvement. I also gained some strong friendships that have lasted more than a decade since I was in the program.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

If I say that I am going to do something, do it now and do it right. One of the key elements of integrity is follow-through, and the more immediately you take action, the better.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18-year-old self?

Don’t be in a rush to be a grown up. Take a gap year. Enjoy every experience open to you. That’s where true learning happens.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

Women will continue to face many of the same challenges we have always faced and one of the reasons for that is that women are not well represented in state and federal legislatures, on the bench and in executive offices. We need to encourage women to run for political office and support those who do.

What do you think organizations need to do differently for more women to rise into executive roles?

Businesses need to allow for more flexible work schedules – the reality is that women are the primary caregivers to children and parents and the business day needs to recognize that reality.

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?

Decisive, Dependable, Optimistic

How do you manage your career, home, and community life?

I achieve balance by starting every day with exercise. That’s what gives me energy to be active all day and to enjoy all of the things that need to be accomplished throughout the day rather than just slogging through them!

What advice do you have for aspiring leaders?

Embrace all opportunities, be very open to change, and don’t underestimate yourself.

Facetime with Jenifer Kimbrough

One of the greatest things about Momentum is the powerful alumnae network. Periodically we interview these amazing women about their experience in our program.

Jenifer Goforth Kimbrough serves as Chief Financial Officer at Oakworth Capital Bank. She has over 20 years of financial services experience which includes serving banking, broker/dealer and insurance clients with Ernst & Young, serving as the director of investor relations at Regions Financial Corporation, and serving on the Board of Directors and as chair of the Audit Committee for a publicly traded property/casualty insurance company. Jenifer graduated from the University of Alabama in 1993 with a Bachelor of Science in Commerce and Business Administration, receiving her CPA certificate soon after.

Additionally, Jenifer has served as the national president of the American Woman’s Society of CPAs and on the AICPA’s Women’s Initiatives Executive Committee. She has served in numerous community volunteer leadership positions including on the Boards of the Junior League of Birmingham, the Mountain Brook PTO Council, and the Ranger PTO.  She teaches Sunday School at Canterbury United Methodist Church and is active with her alma mater, currently serving on The University of Alabama’s Accounting Advisory Board and as a Culverhouse Connections mentor for young women in accounting. Jenifer completed Momentum’s executive leadership program as part of Class Four in 2006. 

What did you gain from your MOMENTUM experience?

More than anything, Momentum gave me a fantastic network of friends and leaders.  That includes members of my own Momentum class as well as other Momentum alumnae.  When you learn that someone that you’ve never met before is a Momentum alumna, there is an instant connection and familiarity between the two of you – I love that!  I also learned to breathe…we have to take time to reflect and recharge.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

Years ago I worked for a partner at Ernst & Young who I  respected immensely, and who counseled me to “paddle your own canoe.”   Don’t worry about anybody else, what opportunities or accolades or financial benefit they may have been given that you weren’t.  Just worry about you and doing the absolute best you can do every day and in every situation. The rest will take care of itself.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

The next generation of women leaders will face a lot of the same challenges we face today!  That said, they will need to figure out what success really means to them (as opposed to someone else’s definition) and then how to go about making it happen.  The pace of change today, driven mainly by technology,  is incredible.  It will require more vision and creativity than ever before to play within a new and ever-changing set of rules in order to stay in front of that change as opposed to trying to fit an existing product or service or idea into a much different paradigm.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18 year old self?

I would say so much!  Here are a few things:  One, to learn as much as I could about what people do and how they do it by asking lots of questions.  Two, to take that knowledge and recognize that I have the opportunity to create my own unique reality over time.  Three, to really appreciate that every human being has something unique and special to offer no matter what package they come wrapped in.

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?

Integrity, Empathy, Visionary

How do you find balance in your career, home, and community life?

For me, the pursuit of career, home, community balance starts with the big picture of knowing what is really important to me in all of the aspects of my life. From there I make sure all decisions, big and small, are consistent with those priorities.

Is there a book that has been helpful to you in your career? If so, please share the title and author.

The book I always seem to come back to is Stephen Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Successful People.  It’s a simple, common sense approach that applies to every endeavor.

Is there anything else you would like to share? Advice you would like to give women in leadership?

Things I’ve been taught from those I was fortunate enough to be “brought along” by….

  • do your best to be your authentic self as you lead
  • remind yourself what it’s like to be led
  • make sure you’d be willing to do anything you ask someone else to do
  • always have someone (or “someones”) you’re bringing along behind you

Facetime with Sandy Thurmond

One of the greatest things about Momentum is the powerful alumnae network. Periodically we interview these amazing women about their experience.

Sandy Thurmond is Vice President of Primary Care Services at Children’s of Alabama where she has worked for thirty years. Sandy is responsible for operations and development of the primary care arm of Children’s as well as for maintaining and improving relationships with pediatricians around the state. Children’s owns thirteen primary care offices which provided over 342,000 medical visits in 2016.

Sandy serves on the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Executive Leadership Team, the United Way’s Women United Advisory Group, the Birmingham Southern College Alumni Board and the UAB Health Administration Women’s Leadership Initiative. She is a past president of both the Alabama Healthcare Executives Forum and UAB’s Graduate Programs in Health Administration Alumni Association from which she received its 2009 Outstanding Alumnus Award. She is an active member of St. Thomas Episcopal Church, and her hobbies include fitness, reading and travel. Sandy is a member of Momentum’s Class 10 and of the Momentum Alumnae Program.

 

What did you gain from your MOMENTUM experience?

In addition to the excellent training provided at the monthly sessions, I gained a network of inspiring, supportive, accomplished and fabulous professional women who I now call friends.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

The path forward is not a linear one – be determined and confident in your ability to master the obstacles you encounter… and in each success, you move along.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

We have the opportunity to lead teams of unparalleled diversity in terms of skills and backgrounds.  However, with the differences in the styles of the generations and genders, we will be challenged to truly listen and be flexible in how we charter, communicate with and problem solve so that we can truly leverage the talents of our teams.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18 year old self?

Be aware that you do not know what you do not know… your success will come through your ability to apply what you do know to the challenges you face.

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?

Integrity, Adaptability, Passion.

How do you find balance in your career, home, and community life?

It is optimistic to say that I find balance, but I believe that by recognizing that I do have finite time and resources and by devoting my limited time and resources to what matters most to me at each time and stage of my life, I do have satisfaction and some balance with my career, home and community lives.  And, I’ve learned to relax without feeling guilty… I enjoy what I am doing or I choose to do something else.

Is there a book that has been helpful to you in your career?

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey… it gave me permission to say no to otherwise worthwhile endeavors allowing me to focus on those special activities and projects aligned to my passions and goals.

Is there anything else you would like to share? Advice you would like to give women in leadership?

We can’t control what the future brings, but we can control how we respond to it. Embrace challenge, empower and support your team and enjoy and be passionate about your work.

 

 

Facetime with Leigh Davis

spotlight-sept-2-16One of the greatest things about MOMENTUM is the powerful alumnae network. Periodically we interview these amazing women about their experience.

As senior vice president and deputy general counsel, Leigh Davis is responsible for generation energy policy, legal and operations strategies for Southern Company’s operations organization, which includes generation, transmission, engineering and construction services, system planning, research and environmental affairs, and the company’s competitive generation business units. She is a graduate of MOMENTUM’s Class of 2008.

What did you gain from your MOMENTUM experience?

Lifelong friends and a growing network of professional women leaders to learn from and lean on.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

Be yourself and have confidence in your own unique strengths and abilities.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

Increasing the value creation to be gained by having more substantive and diverse representation in all levels of leadership, especially at the higher levels of executive management. A lot of value creation is still being left on the table in every industry that an entire workforce would benefit from.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18 year-old self?

Relax!

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?

Integrity, Courage, Excellence.

How do you find balance in your career, home and community life?

There is no balance. Preparation and prioritization are both critical so you can more fully enjoy your busy life with all of its competing demands. Leverage resources you need to fit your own lifestyle and needs without feeling guilty or comparing yourself to others. Be disciplined with what you choose to take on and what you shed from your life.

What other advice would you like to give to women in leadership roles or to those aspiring to lead?

Collaborate, be viewed as one who includes others. Seek to be as approachable, genuine, and trustworthy as possible.

Facetime with Dana Nolan

DanaNolan_DSC1659Dana W. Nolan
Executive Vice President, Head of Investor Relations
Regions

Dana Nolan serves as the Head of Investor Relations at Regions, a regional bank that operates throughout the South, Midwest and Texas and is headquartered in Birmingham, Ala.  Regions is a member of the S&P 500 Index and ranks on the Fortune 500 listing of America’s largest companies.

Nolan joined Regions in 1989. Prior to assuming her current role, she was named associate director of investor relations in 2010 and had previously held a number of positions including Wholesale Funding and Liquidity Manager and head of Debt and Capital Management, both in the bank’s Treasury Division.

Nolan earned a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and is a graduate of the Bank Administrative Institute’s Graduate School of Bank Financial Management at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. She is a member of the National Investor Relations Institute (NIRI) and a member of the bank’s Senior Leadership group.

What did you gain from your MOMENTUM experience?
MOMENTUM provided an invaluable opportunity to connect with professional women and hear their stories of success, ambition, efforts and concerns.  It was an empowering experience that motivated me to invest in myself.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?
Leverage your successes along the way.  Continually remind management of your accomplishments, skills and expertise.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18 year old self?
Rid yourself of preconceived notions of what you “should do” or what you are “supposed to be”.  Career options and choices are limitless.

What three words do you think should characterize every leader?
Humble, determined and visionary

How do you find balance in your career, home, and community life?
Successfully integrating career, family, and personal life continues to be an ongoing challenge.  While I’ve made decisions I regret, I try to learn from those experiences and adjust accordingly.  I am also more comfortable outsourcing certain household tasks and responsibilities which has been very liberating.

Is there a book that has been helpful to you in your career? If so, please share the title and author.
I enjoy reading a variety of books, but I am particularly fond of good biographies.   David McCullough is one of my favorite authors.  Clearly, biographies are informative, but they are often inspirational.  For me, they offer mentors at a distance and promote self discovery.

Is there anything else you would like to share? Advice you would like to give women in leadership?
Women have the tendency to focus and concentrate on tactical rather than strategic leadership. We need to put most decisions in a strategic context and then broadly communicate that context.   Identify new opportunities and trends in your environment and then chart a course that inspires women and men throughout your organization.

 

 

 

 

FaceTime with Dr. Cheri Canon

Cheri L. Canon, M.D., F.A.C.R. is a Professor and Witten-Stanley Endowed Chair of Radiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Radiology. She completed her undergraduate training at the University of Texas at Austin, followed by medical school at the University of Texas Medical Branch. After completing her residency training in Diagnostic Radiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), she joined the faculty in the Abdominal Imaging section.

CLC headshot
Dr. Cheri Canon

Dr. Canon served as the Radiology Residency Program Director and Vice Chair of Education for seven years. She served as the UAB School of Medicine Curriculum Committee Chair, during which time an organ-based curriculum was implemented. She then served as Senior Vice Chair of Operations and Division Director of Diagnostic Radiology before her appointment as Chair. She serves on the UAB Health Services Foundation Board of Directors.

Dr. Canon served as an oral examiner for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) for eleven years. She is a member of the ABR Oral Exam Committee for GI and Chairs the GI Committee for the ABR Certifying and Maintenance of Certification Examinations. She received the ABR Lifetime Service Award in 2013. She is the Chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Commission on Education and the ACR 2015 Program Committee. She sits on the ACR Board of Chancellors. Additionally, she sits on the Boards of Directors for the Association of University Radiologists, the American Institute of Radiologic Pathology, and the Academy of Radiology Research, on which she serves as Academic Council Chair. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

What did you gain from your Momentum experience?

A close network of lifelong friends and colleagues on whom I still rely on to this day, a renewed energy and enthusiasm for my career goals, and a valuable resource for ongoing leadership development.

What is one piece of leadership advice you have been given that has helped you in your career?

Don’t leave decisions to chance. Do your homework before the meeting, discuss strategic variables  in advance with key stakeholders, and know their position before the vote. Don’t assume you can sway them in the board room with data and discussion. By then, the decision has already been made.

What challenges do you think the next generation of women leaders face?

The ongoing challenge of establishing the value of women in leadership. Although we have made great strides, there is much more work to be done.

If you knew then what you know now, what would you tell your 18 year old self?

Be patient, relax, and take it all in. Things happen in due time and shouldn’t be rushed. And always follow your intuition.

What three words should characterize every leader?

Emotionally intelligent, optimistic.

How do find balance in your career, home, and community life?

Still a work in progress and improving every year. I should be there by age 90 or so.

Is there a book that has been helpful to you in your career?

Tough question. There have been so many, and many I go back and re-read depending on the current challenges and environment. My husband would say The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Every problem and leadership challenge  in the world can be solved with the basic principles in this book.

Anything else you would like to share? Advice?

Everything, career, leadership, marriage, family, is a journey with many ups and downs. Be patient and value what you have as it is ever-changing. Don’t waste a moment.

Facetime with Anne Marie Seibel

Brief Bio

Seibel_Anne MarieAnne Marie enjoys pulling together the moving parts in multi-forum or multi-plaintiff high-stakes litigation.  In her cases, she partners with her clients to approach the challenges of litigation in efficient and creative ways.  Currently, she is using these skills to help a major facilitator of online travel reservations respond to cases across the country.  She also played a central role advising HealthSouth Corporation as it defended and prosecuted claims relating to a massive accounting fraud perpetrated against it by corporate officers.  That litigation resulted in a $2.8 billion verdict against the company’s former CEO and $100 million from a settlement with the company’s former investment bank. Anne Marie’s practice has taken her to trial in venues as diverse as Alabama state and federal courts, AAA arbitrations, and the Tribal Court of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. Continue reading “Facetime with Anne Marie Seibel”