Tag: success

Tips on Navigating your Professional Journey

When thinking about our careers, we never want to become so focused in our day-to-day that we forget to look forward to where we want to be.

No matter where we are on our professional journey, we always want to be aware of our career progression.  While also remembering that it takes time to move forward, the workplace isn’t like grade school where we are constantly being tested and reminded that we have either made the mark or we need to step it up. But all in all, each of us is on a path that is hopefully leading us toward a brighter professional future.

It’s easy to think that the first full-time job we had (or are going to have) defined everything, but in all honesty the first ten years are the most crucial. With each new job and position, we want to remember to look for a role that highlights our strengths while challenging us at the same time. Furthermore, we never want to become stagnant.

We recently had the opportunity to hear from Joy Carter and we wanted to share some of her wisdom. Consequently, we want you to keep these ideas in mind while you tackle your professional journey.

A few tips to help your progress:

1. Negotiate your salary. Whether it’s your first job or your last, you’re worth it.

Remember to ask those around you for feedback, insight, and encouragement. Figuring out what your future goals are can be difficult, always feel free to phone a friend.

2. Goals! Goals! Goals! If we consciously take disciplined steps, we will get where we want to be. Every 90 days, set 3-5 goals that you can accomplish. Know where you want to be, and then figure out how to get there.

3. Take advantage of the small moments. Whether that’s taking advantage of the right opportunity over lunch, coffee, or when riding the elevator.

4. Don’t fear feedback; ask for it. Your managers and your peers may have excellent insight for you about your strengths and about ways that you could improve. Are you aware of your RBF?

5. Mentorship is key for all. Observe the people around you in your company or community, and consider creating a mentor relationship with them. Relationship makes us stronger whether you’re the mentor or the mentee. Career decisions can be overwhelming; don’t go it alone.

6. Be aware of all the possible next steps you could take on your professional path in the upcoming five years. Do your best to avoid committing to one direction. Simply be aware of your options.

Career progression can be daunting and illusive. We hope our tips today are a reminder that you are not on this journey alone. Remember to stay disciplined and to always be aware of all the possibilities.

 

Contributing Writer Holly Moore

 

Mentorship: a workplace necessity or a necessity for success?

For the community of business professionals, the idea of mentorship is a hot topic, especially when discussing women in the workplace. We are all aware of the “leaky chasm” where more women are graduating from university than ever before and yet the number of executive leaders is slim. Mikki Taylor, a well-known writer and speaker, said that “many women live like it’s a dress rehearsal. Ladies, the curtain is up and you’re on.” In view of mentoring, it is important for women to take their steps with purpose. It is time we become bold and seek out mentors and mentees. Mentoring future women leaders is a necessity for the workplace as well as personal success.

According to Forbes,  only fifty-four percent of women have access to senior leaders who act as mentors or informal sponsors. The lack of mentors for women is believed to be one of the major reasons we don’t see more women in leadership. Increasingly data show that when more women sit at the decision-making tables, better decisions are made. In order to continue fostering growth, women must begin asking for help and sharing their insight. Mentorship is a wonderful path to begin paving better roads for the future of equality in leadership.

There are countless benefits for both parties involved in a mentoring relationship. According to a recent Forbes article, “it is a broader network of relationships and circumstances that shape individual success.” With many decisions that are made, there are discussions that come before them. When making a change in career choice, almost everyone will phone a trusted friend to hear his or her input and discuss options and concerns. Mentoring is important because there is an educated decision to trust someone who has more experience, a different perspective, and wise recommendations. While the responsibility for life decisions ultimately resides within each of us, we are wise to seek counsel from someone with experience in the issues we face.

The value of mentoring is a two way street, with mentors standing to benefit from the relationship as well. According to a Forbes article, the benefits of  mentoring include new insights into the workforce, valuable connections, new perspective, and the personal satisfaction of sharing experiences. In addition to the personal and professional benefits of a mentor relationship, those who mentor are twenty percent more like to receive a raise.

The guidance, honesty, and input of a mentor can help a mentee become their achieve their personal best. Many mentees desire this relationship to gain knowledge and a specific skill set, but this article points out that they also often receive a broadened perspective, gain connections, learn more about business politics, and gain the confidence to stand on their own. For young professionals who may feel inadequate, take the advice of Sara Blakely, the Founder of Spanx: “Don’t be intimidated by what you don’t know because it can also be your greatest strength and ensure that you do things differently from everyone else.”

A three-tiered mentoring program is an essential part of Momentum’s mission to advance women in leadership. Each year we pair class participants with senior mentors. Upon graduation, participants receive training on successful mentoring and are paired with a teen, college student, or young professional looking for a mentor. Momentum has fostered over 800 mentoring relationships to date.

If you have experiences, opinions or advice on mentoring, we’d love to see your comments here.